Theory

Rational Numbers

The set of rational numbers, represented by the symbol Q,\mathbb{Q}, is formed by all numbers that can be expressed as the ratio between two integers, ab,\frac{a}{b}, where b0.b\neq 0. -3,13,5,3145\begin{gathered} \text{-} 3,\quad\frac{1}{3},\quad 5,\quad\frac{31}{45} \end{gathered} All four of these examples are rational numbers. Note that integers are also rational, because they can always be written as fractions with a denominator of 1.1. -3=-31,5=51\begin{gathered} \text{-}3 = \frac{\text{-}3}{1},\quad 5=\frac{5}{1} \end{gathered} Real numbers which are not rational are called irrational numbers.

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