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Solving Radical Equations

Solving Radical Equations 1.9 - Solution

arrow_back Return to Solving Radical Equations

Let's look at their equations and solutions one at a time.
Lena-Jon's equation
Lena-Jon's equation, x+11=5,\sqrt{x+11}=\sqrt{5}, is a proper radical equation because she has at least one variable under a radical sign. Additionally, she has solved it in a proper manner by squaring both sides and tested her solution.

Ron-Jon's equation
Ron-Jon has solved the equation correctly and tried his solution, but has not formed a radical equation. This is because he did not put any variable under the radical sign, only numbers. Therefore, it is Ron-Jon who made the error.