Expand menu menu_open Minimize Start chapters Home History history History expand_more
{{ item.displayTitle }}
navigate_next
No history yet!
Progress & Statistics equalizer Progress expand_more
Student
navigate_next
Teacher
navigate_next
{{ filterOption.label }}
{{ item.displayTitle }}
{{ item.subject.displayTitle }}
arrow_forward
No results
{{ searchError }}
search
menu_open
{{ courseTrack.displayTitle }}
{{ statistics.percent }}% Sign in to view progress
{{ printedBook.courseTrack.name }} {{ printedBook.name }}
search Use offline Tools apps
Login account_circle menu_open

Solving Quadratic Equations with Square Roots

Solving Quadratic Equations with Square Roots 1.3 - Solution

arrow_back Return to Solving Quadratic Equations with Square Roots

A quadratic equation can be written in the form ax2+bx+c=0,ax^2+bx+c=0, that is, it contains one unknown, at least one x2x^2-term as well as an equal sign. This means that D: x2=25andF: x2+2x30=0 \mathbf{D:} \ x^2=25 \quad \text{and} \quad \mathbf{F:} \ x^2+2x-30=0 are quadratic equations. y=x2+3y=x^2+3 has two unknowns, xx and yy and is therefore a quadratic function. In the first equation, there is no x2x^2-term. Instead the integer 77 is squared, which is another way to write 49.49. 10x28+2x10x^2-8+2x is an algebraic expression since it lacks the equal sign.