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Causation

Concept

Causation

Causation is a relationship between two correlated quantities where one directly affects the other.

  • Causation exists: An example of a correlation where there is also a causation is height and age. Aging directly causes growth, up until some point.
Causality between age and length
  • No causation: In winter, both the number of house fires and car accidents increase — they are correlated. However, house fires do not cause car accidents. There is a potential common factor that can explain the increase in both: winter, which causes both slippery road conditions and more candles to be lit, which leads to more fires. There is a correlation, but no causation.
The difference between correlation and causality